First woman to run Boston Marathon completes race again 50 years later

The event was commemorating 50 years of women running the Boston Marathon, honoring the bold move of Switzer, who signed up ambiguously as K.V. Switzer and became the first female to enter.

In a Facebook post following the race on Monday, Switzer triumphantly wrote, "I finished, like I did 50 years ago".

"I wasn't trying to break any barriers", Switzer, now 70, told SELF past year.

Switzer and Semple, the race official who almost tossed her off the course, have become close friends over the years. A woman named Roberta Gibb had run the previous year unregistered.

'It's not for me, it's for others to be inspired, to be motivated, ' he said of running the race in an interview with WBZ.

"I knew if I dropped out no one would believe women could run distances and deserved to be in the Boston Marathon".

This was Rose's 16th marathon and the fourth time she has completed the Boston Marathon specifically.

Switzer embraced her destiny for her 50th anniversary race and focused on starting healthy and finishing strong.

"It changed everything", she said. "...nor was there anything indicating gender on the entry form".

In fact, CBS News caught up with Switzer later in the day as she took part in the marathon.

"I generally am pretty law-abiding".

"My goal is to reach women in places right now where they're not allowed to leave the house alone, drive a auto or get an education, " Switzer said last week, according to WBZ.

"But am I bold? I ask for forgiveness". "You always want to be a little bit better", Switzer said.

That out-of-control guy was one of the race organizers, Jock Semple.

Switzer's boyfriend shouldered him out of the way, and Switzer ran on.

"...an official tried to eject me from the race simply because I was a woman".

Pictures of that splashed across newspaper front pages, and Switzer somewhat inadvertently became a symbol of the women's movement. "I always thought it [happened] at about two miles", she said.

Fellow Kenyan Edna Kiplagat, 38, won the women's race, crossing the finish line at 2:21:52 in her Boston debut. Switzer then went on to create a global series of races in 27 countries with millions of women.

Switzer was 20 years old when she first ran in the Boston Marathon.

The Boston Athletic Association says that 61 of the runners who entered the race were visually impaired, including Stephanie Zundel, a 22-year-old blind woman who finished the race in just over five hours.

"What happened to me was a radicalizing experience".

Fifty years later, she was awarded the honour of firing the gun for the women's race. I didn't push it.

  • Ernesto Newman